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Historic Houses in Wiltshire

Wiltshire is most famous for its important neolithic monuments, including the stone circles at Stonehenge. Historic Houses in Wiltshire Lacock Abbey, Fox Talbot Museum & Village and Longleat House are listed below.
6 Results In Or Near Wiltshire
in Wiltshire
Discover the Beautiful Lacock Abbey, Fox Talbot Museum and village Lacock Abbey was founded in 1232 and converted into a country house in the mid-16th century, the cloisters and monastic rooms of the Abbey have survived largely intact. On the closure of the monastery it passed to William Sharington. The Strong Room has an important Renaissance carved stone table, supported by 4 satyrs. Various paintings, furniture and a group of watercolours are also on display. The stable courtyard ho...
in Wiltshire
Take a look at a time gone by at Longleat House, a superb example of Elizabethan architecture, and one of the country's finest stately homes. Home to sixteen generations of the Thynn family, the 7th Marquess of Bath is perhaps one of Longleat's most famous residents.
in Wiltshire
Lydiard Park is a beautiful historic estate on the western edge of Swindon, with the Palladian House, Church and Walled Garden, set in 260 acres of parkland.
in Wiltshire
Explore the impressive collections and beautiful interiors at Mompesson House Mompesson House, an elegant and spacious 18th century house in Cathedral Close, was built for Charles Mompesson in 1701. It has magnificent plasterwork, a fine oak staircase and good quality period furniture. The house also contains the Turnbull collection of 18th century drinking glasses. In the Green Room is a display of black and white portrait prints. A well known tenant of the house was Barbara Townsend a...
in Wiltshire
Discover Stourhead House Stourhead House is a Palladian mansion built in the 1720s, which was home to the Hoare family, who are the owners of Britain´s only surviving private bank. The entrance hall has a large collection of Hoare family portraits. The interior includes an outstanding Regency library designed by Colt Hoare in 1792 and decorated with paintings of classical scenes and furniture by Chippendale the Younger. In the gardens are classical temples, including the Pantheon and Te...
in Wiltshire
The House of Thomas Bayly was built following the Great Fire of Marlborough in 1653. Over the years 1653-1700 a fine timber and brick building was constructed,
Reviews: (6)
4 Results Slightly Further Afield
in Gloucestershire
Explore the grandeur of Dyrham Park Dyrham Park is a 17th century mansion built in the baroque style between 1692 and 1704 for William Blathwayt, Secretary of State to William III. The rooms have changed little since they were furnished by Blathwayt. Due to his royal connections, the house became a showcase for Dutch decorative arts. On display are family portraits, paintings, delftware, furniture and a state bed made for the house. The restored Victorian domestic rooms include kitchen...
in Gloucestershire
An Elizabethan Cotswold Manor, the front unaltered for 400 years; played Trenwith House in the hugely popular Poldark. A real gem - Great for Group visits.
Reviews: (1)
in Oxfordshire
Discover, Buscot Park, a magnificent stately mansion and intimate family home The home of Lord Faringdon, 18th century Buscot Park in Oxfordshire is one of those glorious English country estates that whisk you back through the centuries as you wander in awe at the beautiful paintings and plates, pots and urns, furniture and fabrics. If you've the time before you visit, take a look at Buscot's website in which Lord Faringdon himelf explains the history by which he came to live in the hou...
in Oxfordshire
Kelmscott Manor is a 17th century farmhouse known for its inspiration on William Morris - writer, designer and craftsman, who first saw it in 1871. Due to major conservation and improvement works funded by the National Lottery Heritage Fund, the Manor is now closed. Visit the website for more information.
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