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Gardens in or near Aylesbury

Aylesbury is a lively market town in Buckinghamshire, located at the foot of the Chiltern Hills. The focal point in the 17th century English Civil War. With modern shopping areas, the award-wining Roald Dahl children's Gallery and the Guttemann Sports Centre to name but a few attractions. Gardens in or near Aylesbury Waddesdon Manor and Ascott are listed below.
4 Results In Or Near Aylesbury
5.6 miles from centre of Aylesbury
Parking Available
Disabled Access
Discover the Beautiful Waddesdon Manor and gardens Waddesdon Manor and gardens were bequeathed to the National Trust by the Rothschilds in 1957. The garden today is essentially the one laid out by Baron Ferdinand de Rothschild and his French landscape designer Elie Laine. It is one of the finest Victorian gardens in Britain with a parterre, colourful shrubs, rose garden and specimen trees. A rococo-style aviary houses exotic birds and is known for breeding endangered species. The garden...
7.5 miles from centre of Aylesbury
Parking Available
Disabled Access
Explore the beautiful Ascott House and Gardens Once part of the Rothschilds' vast Ascott Estate and now run by the National Trust, Ascott Gardens, on the borders of Bedfordshire and Buckinghamshire, are vast, sweeping classic English grounds with all manner of formal and natural plantings. The gardens (and the wonderful house, stuffed with paintings, fine furniture and oriental porcelain, that looks over it) are open to the public between March and September and cover 30 acres – so th...
11.5 miles from centre of Aylesbury
Dog/Pet friendly
Parking Available
Disabled Access
Hughenden Manor has a rich and varied history. Once the home of Benjamin Disraeli, it was also a covert WWII base that produced maps. Both of these stories are fascinating, and the house and gardens bring them to life.
12 miles from centre of Aylesbury
Dog/Pet friendly
Parking Available
Disabled Access
Discover the fantastic West Wycombe Park West Wycombe Park and gardens were created by Sir Frances Dashwood, founder of the Dilettanti Society in the mid-18th century. New fieldwork has produced evidence of a number of important earlier phases of activity, most notably an Iron Age hillfort and associated prehistoric field system. The classically-inspired park itself, comprises formal drives, vistas, walks and woodland areas, as well as a wide range of garden statuary and ornamental l...
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