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Ten Things to Do in London for Free

by Ben West (June 2013)

Whoever originally said that the best things in life are free has clearly never driven a factory-fresh Ferrari. That said, a visit to London can be pretty hard on the wallet for most people and therefore the fact that you can build an itinerary in the capital costing absolutely nothing can be immensely gratifying as well as a great relief. Splashing out for expensive admission tickets to a tourist attraction is no guarantee of satisfaction and indeed some of Britain's premier museums, galleries and other attractions cost nothing to enter. Here's a selection that will hopefully demonstrate some of the huge diversity London has to offer.


Showing below are all 7 records in "Ten Things to Do in London for Free"

Old Spitalfields Market

105a Commercial Street, Spitalfields, London

Old Spitalfields Market, 105a Commercial Street, London, London

Occupying Victorian buildings of the original fruit and vegetable market built in 1876 and which have recently been expanded, this lively, colourful market features a whole host of stalls to browse, offering everything from fashion to furniture, from up-and-coming designers as well as vintage creations. There's also cds and vinyl, food and artworks, quirky craftwork creations and much more.

Lee Valley Regional Park, Enfield, London

Stretching 26 miles from the Thames at Bow in east London to the River Lee at Ware in Hertfordshire, Lee Valley is so large - nearly four times the size of Richmond Park - that it offers many leisure opportunities, including walking, cycling, riverside trails and bird watching. There are lakes, nature reserves and heritage sites, and Myddleton House Gardens, with its rich plantlife.

Geffrye Museum of the Home

136 Kingsland Road, Hoxton, London

Geffrye Museum of the Home, 136 Kingsland Road, London, London

Often overlooked by visitors to London, this charming museum located in a complex of attractive 18th century almshouses and pleasant, peaceful grounds features fascinating displays depicting eleven typical rooms from before 1600 to the present to show the changing style of English homes. There is also a walled herb garden and four gardens from different eras.

British Museum

Great Russell Street, London

British Museum, Great Russell Street, London, London

Founded in 1753 and dedicated to human history and culture, this is London's most popular attraction. Housing millions of works from around the world and from prehistoric times onwards, highlights include the Egyptian mummies, the Rosetta Stone, Sutton Hoo treasure, the Lewis chessmen, and the Elgin Marbles.

Guildhall Art Gallery & Roman London´s Amphitheatre, Guildhall Yard, London, London

The first Guildhall Art Gallery was built in 1885 to display the City of London Corporation's growing art collection, and in 1988 the remains of London's only Roman Amphitheatre were discovered, and displayed to the public in 2002. The Gallery features about 250 artworks from its collection of paintings, drawings and sculpture.

Westminster Cathedral

Ambrosden Avenue, London

Westminster Cathedral, Ambrosden Avenue, London, London

This imposing, oft-forgotten red and white brick Catholic cathedral boasts stunning Byzantine architecture, and its vast, tranquil interior features stunning mosaics, striking chapels, Eric Gill sculptures, and columns made from many types of marble. It has the widest nave in England, at 18 metres.

Sir John Soane´s Museum

13 Lincolns Inn Fields, London

Sir John Soane´s Museum, 13 Lincolns Inn Fields, London, London

The three linked Georgian townhouses here display Soane's wondrous and eccentric collection including paintings, plasterwork, sculptures, books, antiquities, models of buildings and chilling tombs complete with skeletons. There's a surprise at every corner, whether a false wall swinging back to reveal a second wall, or a new alcove crammed with more treasures.


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